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02.06.2016

Understanding of the CAN bus 3.

General information about CAN bus part 3.

SAILOR 63 xx MF / HF

This section will cover the following questions :

  • CAN-bus and radio equipment SAILOR 63xx MF / HF
  • Cable connections of modules CU-TU SAILOR MF / HF
  • Connections and connecting boxes of the CAN-bus for MF / HF equipment
  • Examples of CAN-bus connection schemes with MF / HF equipment

Bus CAN- bus and radio series 6000- the MF / of HF

The CAN bus protocol was used for communication between the SAILOR radio equipment modules for several years and, consequently, this level of the 2000 NMEA communication channel was adapted
at a rather early stage. However, with regard to the physical layer of the 2000 NMEA,
adaptation has not been performed, for reasons that will become obvious, if we look at, for example, the number of different signals that the modules exchange.

In the MF / HF series, intermodule connections are made using 12 wires, the wiring of which is shown below.

Schematic diagram of CAN-bus connection with MF / HF devices

CAN bus connection with MF / HF devices .

This illustration shows a simple CAN-bus connection used for MF / HF equipment. It should be noted that the CAN cable connecting the control unit (CU) and the transceiver module (TU) is 12-wire, which indicates the presence of other signals in addition to the CAN_H CAN_L bus signals exchanged between the two modules. Among them are audio signals for transmitting and receiving Rx and Tx, power for the CU module, and so on.

The main requirements of the CAN bus are also applied to this connection, hence the
maximum cable length of 6 m indicates that this section is considered as a "descent line" in the terminology of the 2000 NMEA.

In this illustration, the TU-CU connection is longer than the maximum distance of 6 m provided by the standard supplied CAN cable.

In terms of NMEA 2000, a backbone network was created here to provide the necessary length connection. One end of the "trunk" is loaded in the TU by default, while the load of the other end is the terminal resistor built into the junction box. The CU module is connected to the "main line" via the "drop line" (maximum length is 6 m). 

In this illustration, two CU modules are connected to the TU.

There is a "backbone network" going from the TU module to the on-net junction box with a tap to the first CU module, and then to the second junction box at the other end of the "trunk". A terminal resistor is installed in the terminal junction box to accommodate the CAN bus. Thus, the network is loaded at both ends - a resistor of the other end is installed in the TU module.     

The second module CU is connected to the junction box via the "drop line".

This illustration shows one CU module and one telex terminal connected to the TU module.

As with the two CU modules, there is a "backbone network" going from the TU module to the on-net junction box with a branch to the CU module (the first CAN bus device), and then to the second junction box at the other end of the "trunk". A terminal resistor is installed in the terminal junction box to accommodate the CAN bus. Thus, the network is loaded at both ends - a resistor of the other end is installed in the TU module.

The telex connection terminal is connected to the second junction box via the "drop line".

SAILOR 62 xx VHF

This section will cover the following questions:

  • CAN-bus and radio equipment SAILOR 62xx VHF
  • SAILOR VHF - cable connections for a remote control headset
  • Connections and junction boxes of the CAN-bus for VHF equipment
  • Examples of CAN-bus connection schemes with VHF equipment

Bus CAN- bus and radio series 6000- the VHF

As with the MF / HF series, the CAN bus was used for
previous VHF products as a data link between the
main VHF modules and remote control devices.

The requirements for the number of different signals exchanged between the 6000 VHF series modules are  similar to the requirements for MF / HF devices. Thus, the cable connections and wiring of the connectors differ from those previously considered only by the presence of several additional signals.

Bus CAN- bus and radio series 6000- the VHF

The radio equipment of the 6000 series VHF can be used with various
remote control units connected via the CAN bus. The CAN bus architecture does not depend on the type of VHF device and the type of remote control unit. However, not all available remote control units can be used with certain radio devices.
To avoid misunderstandings, below are examples of connecting equipment of various types. To continue, click the desired device.

Connecting VHF equipment to the CAN bus

This illustration shows a simple diagram of connecting the VHF equipment to the CAN bus.

Connecting VHF equipment to the CAN bus

This illustration shows a simple diagram of connecting the VHF equipment to the CAN bus.

Connecting VHF equipment to the CAN bus

This illustration shows a simple diagram of connecting the VHF equipment to the CAN bus.

Connecting VHF equipment to the CAN bus

This illustration shows a simple diagram of connecting the VHF equipment to the CAN bus.

General information about the  CAN bus  part 1.



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